Disable Farmer Evicted From Farm in Zimbabwe 




A group of human rights activists in Zimbabwe have criticized Zimbabwe authorities over mistreatment of a disabled white farmer whose farm was taken over by government.

This comes after  the Constitutional Court in Zimbabwe’s capital, Harare,  dismissed an application filed by a disabled white farmer, William Stander, a double amputee, seeking to stop his eviction and the expropriation of his farm by government.

In the application, Stander claimed that he was being deprived of his only home and source of livelihood.

“Our government is insensitive otherwise it would not throw out a disabled person from his farm,” said Richard Nzoni, human rights activist. “I am  going to meet with other human rights activist and see how we can help Stander.”

Another activist, John Mchenda, said that the leaders in Zimbabwe, most of them Christians, should try to be kind to others as the Bible teaches. He said, “the Bible teaches us to love each other and to always to help those with problems. Surely what do the leaders think as the disabled white farmer is thrown out of his farm?”

The farmer was accused of contravening the Gazetted Lands Act after failing to vacate his farm.

He filed a Constitutional Court application seeking compensation or return of his farm located on  Lot 18 of Nuanetsi Ranch, claiming that the seizure of his farm was an infringement of constitutional rights of people living with disabilities.

But prosecutor  Fortunate Kachidza said that Stander’s application lacked merit and that he was supposed to vacate the farm, since it had been taken over by government.

The Chief Justice Godfrey Chidyausiku concurred with the prosecutor and dismissed Stander’s application saying it lacks merit.

Many farmers in Zimbabwe have lost their farms after government decided to hand them to indigenous citizens accusing the whites of having unlawfully grabbed the fertile land from their forefathers. Some of the white farmers resolved to fight for their farms in courts of law but most of them have lost the cases due to the judiciary being biased.